Mar 262015 7 Responses

When It’s Cool to Mock Christianity

Mocking Christianity is the latest American sport. Everywhere one looks, there are articles espousing the evils of faith, laughing at the irrationality of belief, and belittling Christian thought.

Some of this critique is deserved. (See: A Christian Response to an Atheist Billboard)

Many Christians have chosen actions contrary to love. Others have communicated a false doctrine or blindly espoused a weak faith. A few have even promoted evil in the name of Jesus.

All of these actions deserve rebuke.

Even when Christianity is properly displayed, intelligently communicated, and genuinely lived, it still can be fairly criticized. No one is forced to believe in God or the message of Jesus. Anyone is allowed to disagree and to fairly communicate their belief.

However, in many instances a fair critique has been exchanged for a petty mockery. Instead of debating the best, confronting the true teachings of the faith, and pointing out a different way to live, critics have failed to understand the Christian viewpoint, intentionally denied its strong points, and highlighted the worst among us.

I’m struck with how often I read an article about someone who has left the faith or who disagrees with the Christian viewpoint and I agree with their article. The faith they left or don’t believe is not the true Christian story. Maybe it’s religion or a political thought or some cultural ideal, but it has nothing to do with Jesus and true Christian belief. (See: Stop Whining About the Church)

There is a common characteristic with those who mock Christianity.

Critics are loud in the realm of politics.

They are everywhere on social media.

The voices are many in social issues.

But where are those voices when others are suffering?

I don’t hear them in the jails trying to help those who have made bad choices.

I don’t see them among the poor trying to feed, clothe, or house those who are without.

I’ve never run into one of these mockers at a hospital, a funeral home, or a courtroom.

It’s easy to mock Christianity on Facebook, but it’s hard for me to take the mockery seriously when all I see them doing is mocking and never serving.

Yes, many Christians are hypocrites.

Yes, Christians have made major mistakes.

Yes, many claim to do things in the name of Jesus that have nothing to do with Jesus.

But many other Christians are doing amazing things to help the poor, the hurting, and those in need.

Where is the cynic when the someone is dying?

Where is the skeptic in helping those with addictions?

Where is the doubter at the funeral home? (See: A True Picture of Justice and Grace)

I read, and sometimes even agree, with those criticizing aspects of Christianity, but I also see another side of the Christian story.

I see:

  • people bringing meals to a family on a nightly basis as a loved one is in the hospital
  • a man visiting the family of a dying patient hoping to bring them comfort even though he has never met them
  • a pastor meeting with a couple whose marriage is in chaos
  • friends taking off work to sit with a family whose loved one is having surgery
  • yard work being done by young people for an elderly woman who lost her husband

All of these things are being done by people because their faith compels them to action. Are they perfect people? By no means. But they are people doing good work in response to their beliefs. And where did I get these five examples? They all happened yesterday by people I know.

One look at our church calendar and I see eight different meetings taking place this week for those struggling with addictions, love ones who are addicted, grief, or other issues. Why only eight? Because it’s Spring Break and most meetings are cancelled. Beyond those meetings, a civic group is using our parking lot for a fundraiser, someone who has never attended our church is having the funeral in our worship center (for free), and we are putting several people to work so they can earn money to pay off their bills. (See: Why Our Church Hosts LGBTQ Funerals)

I would never claim Christians are the only ones doing good work in our communities. I know that is not the case. Many people are doing many wonderful things to make the world a better place. But what I have noticed is that rarely are those who mock the church doing much of anything worthwhile.

Could it be that the mockery has less to do with critiquing the church and more to do with making the mocker feel better about themselves? 

It’s cool to make fun of Christianity today. That’s fine.  Just realize for every one story  you read on Facebook which mocks the Christian faith, I could tell you ten stories of average people, who because of their faith, are sacrificing their time and money to help someone else.

7 Responses to When It’s Cool to Mock Christianity
  1. stevebrawner Reply

    Thanks for sharing. Truly, the cynics rarely accomplish anything.

    This is not “No, but” but “Yes, and.”

    I hear a lot of mocking by Christians these days, too. There’s just a real smug, sarcastic attitude these days in everyday discourse wherever you go. It’s like life has become a talk radio show. The scornful reaction of many white Christians to President Obama has grieved me deeply.

    Must we hate people we disagree with? I end up keeping my mouth shut in a lot of social circumstances because otherwise I’ll just be drawn into the negativity.

    This has become an age of contempt, from all sides. Sadly, i’s not just cool to mock Christianity these days. It’s just cool to mock, period.

  2. Aloise Reply

    Powerful message here. Thanks again!

  3. ge424 Reply

    You can believe anything you want as long as you don’t force it onto other people. My neighbor believes his wood shed is god. I think he’s an idiot and mock him for his stupid belief. He tells me I need to have faith. The more something seems to be untrue, the greater the faith is that continues to believe in it. He is so convinced in his faith, he tells other people they are going to go to hell if they don’t believe. He is that convinced. He says that at least he can see his wood shed. Prove their was a talking snake. I concede the point. The Bible claims it is true because in the Bible it says it is true. He says on the back wall of the wood shed a mysterious carving appeared one day. Carved into the wood were the words, “I am God. Believe in me.” That’s not evidence I said. It was probably your teenage kids trying out their carving knives. Since then, he will no longer talk to me. He says that he doesn’t associate with the unfaithful. So, yeah, I mock his faith and I mock yours. You all believe in stupid fables. When you can prove there is a god, we’ll have something to discuss. Until then, pay your taxes like any other business. Faith is for the weak of thought.

    • Kevin A. Thompson Reply

      Christianity is not built on the Bible claiming itself to be true. Christianity is built on what we believe to be historical events–the birth, life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. For us, faith is not a blind belief. I understand why many doubt the resurrection, but there seems to be a lot of evidence for it.

  4. Jimmy Ipock Reply

    I don’t believe there is much evidence for belief in the resurrection at all. I’ve looked at the evidence, it’s not very convincing.

  5. Guest Reply

    I mock Mock, and I especially mock Mocks, which means I mock mock Mocks!

    Time to leave this word in the 19th century where it belongs!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Please enter your name, email and a comment.